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Virtual Tour

Edward ShannonProfessor of Literature

Year Joined RCNJ: 1997

Contact Information

Education:

  • B.A., Ramapo College of New Jersey
  • M.A., North Carolina State University
  • Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Courses Offered:

For the Literature major:

  • Contemporary American Literature
  • Comic American Novel
  • 20th Century American Novel
  • Survey of American Literature I & II
  • Major Authors: Mark Twain

For the American Studies major:

  • American Crime Fiction and Film
  • Comics and American Culture

For the Mals Graduate Program:

  • American Gothic: The Literacy Tradition
  • American Folk: The Voice of the People in American Literature

Teaching Interests:

  • American Literature especially twentieth century fiction

Research Interests:

  • Literary studies that overlap with popular culture
  • American folk music
  • Detective Fiction

Scholarly Activity:

  • “’Don’t Call Me Woody’: The Punk Compassion and Folk Rebellion of Joe Strummer and Woody Guthrie.” Punk Rock Warlord: The Life and Work of Joe Strummer. Eds. Barry J. Faulk and Brady Harrison. Surrey, England: Ashgate Books, 2013.
  • “Shameful, Impure Art: Robert Crumb’s Autobiographical Comics and the Confessional Poets.” Biography 35.4 (Fall 2013).
  • “Art and Commerce in the Classroom.” Teaching Comics and Graphic Narratives. Ed. Lan Dong. Jefferson, NC: McFarland. 2012.
  • “Something Black in the American Psyche: Formal Innovation and Freudian Imagery in the Comics of Winsor McCay and Robert Crumb.” The Canadian Review of American Studies. July 2010.
  • “Our Clothes are a Lie Disguise and Christian Typology in Pudd’nhead WilsonMark Twain Annual.2009.
  • “Tom Ripley.” Student’s Companion to American Literary Characters, Facts on File. 2007.
  • “Talkin’ World Revolution: Woody Guthrie’s Seeds of Man as Socialist Parable.” Intersecting Paths: Continuing Legacy of Old Southwestern Humor. Ed. Ed Piacentino, Baton Rouge: Louisiana State UP. 2006
  • “Where was the sex?’: Fetishism and Dirty Minds in Patricia Highsmith’s The Talented Mr. Ripley.” Modern Language Studies. 34.1, Spring 2005.
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