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The Center for Reading and Writing offers one-on-one, face-to-face consultations for Ramapo College students on ALL academic levels.  Working to support Writing- Across-the-Curriculum (WAC) initiatives, the Center promotes writing-as-a-process and encourages students to seek reader responses from our consultants.  Additionally, reading consulting is offered on deciphering and annotating texts, as well as close, critical and analytical reading. Study skills support is also available including methods, planning and strategies.

The Consultants

Most of the consultants who work in the Center are peer consultants.  Peer consultants are third- and fourth-year students who have been through a rigorous hiring process and trained in best practices.  They are available to support your writing and reading instruction in a variety of ways, both in the classroom and in the Center.  Currently we also have one professional consultant, who has graduate training for working with ESL.  The Center depends on faculty to encourage promising students to apply for positions as peer consultants, so if you have any students who seem well-suited to work in the Center, please tell them so, and suggest that they contact Tom Kitchen at tkitche1@ramapo.edu with any questions or requests for information.

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Services For Your Students

In addition to one-on-one consulting in the Center, the following services are offered:  the Road Show, consultant pairing, in-class workshops and peer review sessions, and out-of-class workshops (see below).

The Road Show

Center staff and tutors are available each semester to make brief presentations (10 min.) in your classes on the services available to your students.  These presentations cover the tutoring services in writing, reading, and study skills, course-specific tutoring, and the Center’s location and operating hours. To request the Road Show, fill out the Faculty Workshops Request Form on this page and send to Priscilla Tovey VanAulen at ptovey@ramapo.edu at least two weeks prior to the event date.

Tutor-Pairing Program

The Tutor-Pairing program matches writing tutors with specific courses and instructors.  These tutors will  meet with you to discuss your course writing assignments, introduce themselves to your class(es), and work with your students in the Center.  They’re also available to attend peer-review classes and facilitate short writing workshops.  While they are not expected to serve as TAs or do the course readings, they can provide some valuable assistance to you and your students.  For more information and/or to request a tutor, contact Priscilla Tovey VanAulen at ptovey@ramapo.edu

Following are some comments from instructors who have participated in the program:

  • “Amanda and I exchanged several emails before the semester began, and she visited my class and spent well over an hour going over the first essay topics. Amanda brought tips for effective writing and could not have been more engaging.  My students really responded well to her and welcomed her into our circle.  This is a great program! ” E. Dolgin
  • “I am delighted with the effective help my students have been getting from Sarah.  As a former students of mine, she really knows what I tend to focus on and is familiar with the writing assignments.”  D. Tomko
  • “Taylor is the tutor for my Readings in the Humanities class. She has explained the services of the writing center, done a lesson on the proper development of essays,  and is scheduled to do a culminating lesson on critiquing and research techniques.  She has done an outstanding job which is exemplified in the quality of my students’ essays.  This is undoubtedly a reflection of the excellent program you have developed.”   R. Gratale

In-Class Workshops

You may request class-time writing and reading workshops on a variety of topics.  Workshops run from 30-45 minutes and are facilitated by Center staff and tutors.  Requests must be received at least three weeks in advance of class presentation dates.   To request a workshop, fill out the Faculty Workshops Request Form on this page and send to: Priscilla Tovey VanAulen, Outreach Coordinator, CRW, at ptovey@ramapo.edu.  You will be contacted by a Center staff member to discuss your request.

In-Class Peer Review Sessions

Tutors are available to join your students for peer-review classes and assist them individually and in small groups.  This service is part of the Tutor-Pairing Program but is also available to non-participants.  A tutor will contact you in advance of the session to discuss the assignment and the peer review process you use. Please email Priscilla Tovey VanAulen in the Center for Reading and Writing to request a tutor: ptovey@ramapo.edu.  Requests should be sent at least three weeks prior to the session date.

Out-of-Class Workshops

The Center offers a variety of 30-45 minute workshops throughout the semester that take place at 1:00, as well as in the evenings. Workshop topics include using style guides:  MLA, APA, and Chicago; common sentence errors, close reading strategies, and the research paper.   Some professors encourage students to attend by giving them course enrichment credit.  Your ideas/suggestions on how we can further develop and enhance the workshop program are always welcome.  The Student Workshop Schedule is on the right sidebar of this page.

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Faculty Workshops

The Center will also offer faculty workshops during the 2012-13 academic year to support WAC initiatives  Some of the topics that may be addressed are: designing an effective writing assignment, facilitating a classroom peer-review session, and responding to student writing. Topics will be driven by faculty needs/requests.  The faculty workshop schedule will be posted on the right sidebar of this page.

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How to Request a Workshop

To request the Road Show or a workshop, download the form below and send it to Priscilla Tovey VanAulen, Outreach Coordinator, Center for Reading and Writing at ptovey@ramapo.edu..

Workshops Request Forms (DOC)

 

Ramapo

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Instructional Resources

The Center for Reading and Writing uses the following instructional resources in assisting students.  Feel free to use these resources in designing instructional plans and activities for your students.

Instructors can use the next two resources in preparing students for a peer review activity, paper conference, or writing center visit:

The University of Washington Bothell Online Writing Center provides a writing self assessment for a student to reflect on strengths and weaknesses as a reader and writer. Encouraging the student to complete as much of the form as possible also helps the student to set expectations and goals for the tutorial.  Download the “Writing Self Assessment Form” when you go to http://www.uwb.edu/getattachment/writingcenter/assessment/writself2.pdf

The Online Writing Resource Center at Bemidjii State University offers the student suggestions on how to prepare for a reading and writing tutorial.  Go to “Getting Ready for a Tutoring Session” when you click on http://www.bemidjistate.edu/students/wrc/tutoring_session/

Strategies and Tasks in Developing an Argument and Working Thesis

The Portland State University Online Writing Center provides a comprehensive guided tour to writing papers. Below are steps of the writing process:

  • Step 1: Understanding an Assignment
  • Step 2: Finding a Topic
  • Step 3: Developing a Working Thesis
  • Step 4: Researching
  • Step 5: Creating an Organizational Plan
  • Step 6: Writing a First Draft
  • Step 7: Expanding and Improving Ideas
  • Step 8: Improving and Refining Organization
  • Step 9: Checking Your Use of Research
  • Step 10: Checking Final Details

Explore steps 1 through 10 when you go to http://writingcenter.pdx.edu/resources/guide/index.php

The Online Writing Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provides thorough, easy-to-understand directions in helping writers develop an argument and thesis statement.  Under “Writing the Paper,” click on “Argument” and/or “Thesis Statements” when you go to http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/

Colorado State University’s online writing resources provide an example of a student’s argumentative essay entitled “Landscaping that Makes Sense for the West.” The “virtual tour” of the student’s essay begins with an analysis of the student’s claim, reasoning, evidence, and counter-argument. The tour ends with an assessment of the student’s effectiveness in making the argument and urges the reader to arrive at a claim based on the student’s argument. The essay can be used as a demonstration of argumentative writing which in turn provides a greater understanding of thesis paper writing. Go to http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/reading/toulmin/pop2f.cfm.

Pre-writing Strategies and Tasks

Prewriting tasks are an immediate and effective way to relax, engage, and re-inform the writer about what the writer already knows in order to pursue the writing assignment. Pre-writing strategies serve the following purposes:

  • Function as ice-breakers and help the writer overcome writer’s block.
  • Immediately engage the writer and further motivate the writer to pursue the assignment.
  • Enable the writer to explore and discover perspectives or convictions that may be used in pursuing the assignment.

The University of Kansas Online Writing Center describes the following prewriting strategies and activities:

  • Brainstorming
  • Clustering
  • Freewriting
  • Looping
  • Questioning techniques

Go to http://www.writing.ku.edu/prewriting-strategies.

After prewriting, the writer can develop an organizational plan and tentative outline.

The Portland State University Online Writing Center provides suggestions on creating an organizational plan and outline. Go to http://writingcenter.pdx.edu/resources/guide/step05.php.

The University of Kansas Online Writing Center provides directions on basic outlining of a thesis with topic sentences. Go to http://www.writing.ku.edu/outlines.

Troy University’s Writing Center offers directions on outlining of a thesis, with topic sentences as well as primary and secondary support . Go to http://trojan.troy.edu/writingcenter/assets/documents/handouts/EssayOutlineForm.pdf.

Troy University’s Writing Center also offers directions on outlining a body paragraph with a topic sentence as well as primary and secondary support . Go to http://trojan.troy.edu/writingcenter/assets/documents/handouts/BodyParagraphOutline.pdf

Drafting Strategies and Tasks

Colorado State University has an online writing guide, “Planning, Drafting, and Organizing,” which can be used to assist a writer in starting a draft. The guide suggests the following strategies that writers can use to develop a draft:

  • Defining terms and concepts
  • Analyzing statements, ideas, and concepts
  • Amplifying, clarifying, and explaining ideas
  • Citing authority
  • Citing common assumptions
  • Qualifying assertions
  • Providing contexts or associations for ideas and examples
  • Using analogy
  • Appealing to emotion

Go to http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/processes/develop/.

The Portland State University Online Writing Center provides strategies on writing introductions . Go to http://writingcenter.pdx.edu/resources/guide/step07.php#detail1.

Troy University’s Online Writing Center provides strategies on writing conclusions. Go to http://trojan.troy.edu/writingcenter/assets/documents/handouts/WritingConclusions.pdf.

Strategies in Using Direct/Indirect Quotations and Avoiding Plagiarism

The following skills are necessary in writing a thesis paper:

  • Emphasizing and explaining how a direct or indirect quote supports the main idea of a paragraph
  • Citing and documenting correctly
  • Detecting and avoiding plagiarism

The University of Kansas Online Writing Center provides basic directions on incorporating references and citing quotes. Go to http://www.writing.ku.edu/incorporating-references.

Portland State University’s Online Writing Center provides a comprehensive overview on incorporating research and using citations and documentation correctly. Go to http://writingcenter.pdx.edu/resources/guide/step09.php.

The University of Kansas Online Writing Center provides directions on writing the paraphrase, summary, or précis. Go to http://www.writing.ku.edu/paraphrase-and-summary.

Troy University’s Online Writing Center suggests signal phrases to highlight the use of direct and indirect quotes. Go to http://trojan.troy.edu/writingcenter/assets/documents/handouts/CitingQuotations.pdf.

Troy University’s Online Writing Center also suggests transitional words and phrases to highlight the use of direct and indirect quotes.

Troy University’s Online Writing Center suggests ways to detect and avoid plagiarism.  Click on “Plagiarism” OR “Plagiarism-Making Sure You Are Safe” when you go to http://trojan.troy.edu/research/,

Responding to a Draft and Planning Revision Strategies

Revision and the intricacies of re-reading and re-thinking are challenging skills even for knowledgeable and experienced writers.

An overview of revision strategies can be found at the Harvard College Online Writing Center.  Go to http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~wricntr/documents/Revising.html.

Troy University’s Online Writing Center provides another overview of revision strategies. Go to http://trojan.troy.edu/writingcenter/assets/documents/handouts/ProofreadAndRevise.pdf.

These overviews can be simplified into manageable initial strategies for revision. For example, the student can revise by reading the draft and completing the following directions:

  • Re-state topic sentences to support the thesis
  • Re-state the thesis in alignment with topic sentences
  • Examine the relevance of supporting examples
  • Emphasize and explain how direct or indirect quotes support the main ideas of the body paragraphs
  • Add, delete, or clarify ideas and sentences in the introduction, body paragraphs, and conclusion.
  • Substitute weak words with more precise words. The Online Writing Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provides a guide on word-choice. Go to http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/word_choice.html
  • Eliminate wordiness and ensure conciseness. Troy University’s Online Writing Center provides a guide on eliminating wordiness. Go to http://trojan.troy.edu/writingcenter/assets/documents/handouts/Conciseness.pdf. The Online Writing Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provides another online guide on eliminating wordiness. Go to http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/writing-concisely/

The Portland State University Online Writing Center provides comprehensive revision strategies. The writer can click on the following steps of the writing process and learn more about revision strategies:

  • Step 7: Expanding and Improving Ideas
  • Step 8: Improving and Refining Organization
  • Step 9: Checking Your Use of Research
  • Step 10: Checking Final Details

Click on steps 7 through 10 when you go to http://writingcenter.pdx.edu/resources/guide/index.php.

To develop probing questioning techniques to assist an experienced writer with higher-level revision, the writer can consult Toledo’s journal article on developing probing questioning techniques. To find Toledo’s article, “‘Does Your Dog Bite?’ Creating Good Questions for Online Discussions,” go to http://www.isetl.org/ijtlhe/pdf/IJTLHE85.pdf.

Proofreading and Editing Strategies

The Center for Reading and Writing at SUNY Adirondack offers an online Proofreading Handbook that provides proofreading tips in assisting writers with low-level editing problems. These problems include fragments, run-ons, shifts in tense, shifts in point-of-view, plurals and possessives, subject/verb agreement, pronoun usage, punctuation, capitalization, and homonyms.  Click on each of the two Proofreading Handbooks when you go to libguides.sunyacc.edu/content.php?pid=47858&sid=1008451

A comprehensive online overview of higher-level proofreading and editing strategies can be found at the Harvard College Writing Center website.  Click on “Editing the Essay, Part 1” OR “Editing the Essay, Part 2” when you go to http://isites.harvard.edu/icb/icb.do?keyword=k33202&pageid=icb.page143936

Documentation, Style Manuals, and Writer's Resources

To find MLA, APA, and Chicago online guidelines for documentation, the writer can google “Diana Hacker’s Research and Documentation Online.”

The Turabian or Chicago-Style Citation Quick Guide on the Chicago Manual of Style Online can be accessed at chicagomanualofstyle.org

The Center for Reading and Writing at SUNY Adirondack offers two easy-to-use online style manuals: Using MLA to Document Your Sources and Using APA to Document Your Sources. These online handbooksprovide tips in assisting writers with documentation. Go to libguides.sunyacc.edu/content.php?pid=47858&sid=1008451

Troy University’s Writing Center provides online Turabian or Chicago Style Guides. Go to http://trojan.troy.edu/writingcenter/assets/documents/handouts/ChicagoHandout.pdf.

LINKS TO INTERNET REFERENCES, SUCH AS DICTIONARIES, STYLE MANUALS, GRAMMAR HANDBOOKS, AND EDITING RESOURCES

Purdue’s Online Writing Lab provides links to valuable writing references.
Go to owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/738/01/ Under “Internet References,” Click on any resource, such as “Dictionaries and Manuals.”

Guides to Writing in the Disciplines

Troy University’s Writing Center offers an online practical guide to answering essay questions. Go to http://trojan.troy.edu/writingcenter/assets/documents/handouts/AnsweringEssayQuestions.pdf.

The Writing Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provides an online comprehensive guide to answering essay exams. Go to http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/essay-exams.html.

DePaul University’s Online Center for Writing-based Learning provides an overview of research-based writing, such as directions for writing an annotated bibliography.   Cick on “Annotated Bibliography” or other types of research-based writing when you go to http://condor.depaul.edu/writing/writers/types.html,

The Online Writing Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provides a guide to writing abstracts. Go to http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/abstracts/.

The University of Kansas Online Writing Center has links to resources in evaluating websites. Go to “Evaluating Web-Sites.”

Purdue’s Online Writing Lab provides subject specific resources for writing in the disciplines:

  • Technical Writing
  • Literature
  • Social Sciences
  • Engineering
  • Creative Writing
  • Medical Writing
  • Journalism
  • Nursing

Explore links to writing in various disciplines when you go to http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/4/

The Online Writing Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provides guides and resources for writing in the disciplines.

  • Anthropology
  • Art History
  • Communication Studies
  • Drama
  • History
  • Literature (Fiction)
  • Philosophy
  • Political Science
  • Religious Studies
  • Sciences
  • Sociology

Under “Writing for Specific Fields,” click on a discipline when you go to http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/,

List of Instructional Resources

“Abstracts,” The Writing Center.  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2007.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/abstracts.html

“Answering Essay Questions.” Writing Center.  Troy University, 2010.  Web. 19 Jan 2011. http://trojan.troy.edu/writingcenter/special.html.

“Argument.”  The Writing Center.  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2007.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/argument.html

“Body Paragraph Outline.” Writing Center.  Troy University, 2010.  Web. 19 Jan 2011. http://trojan.troy.edu/writingcenter/process.html.

“Chicago (Turabian) Documentation.” Writing Center.  Troy University, 2010.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://trojan.troy.edu/research/.

“Citing Quotations.”  Writing Center.  Troy University, 2010.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://trojan.troy.edu/research/.

“Editing the Essay, Part 1” The Writing Center.  Harvard College Writing Program, 2011.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  www.fas.harvard.edu/~wricntr/documents/edit1.html.

“Editing the Essay, Part 2.” The Writing Center.  Harvard College Writing Program, 2011.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  www.fas.harvard.edu/~wricntr/documents/edit2.html.

“Essay Exams.” The Writing Center.  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2007.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/essay-exams/

“Essay Outline.” Writing Center.  Troy University, 2010.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://trojan.troy.edu/writingcenter/process.html.

“Evaluating Web-Sites.” KU Writing Center.  University of Kansas, 2011.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://www.writing.ku.edu/evaluating-web-sites.

“Getting Ready for a Tutoring Session.” Writing Resource Center.  Bemidjii State University, 2011. Web. 18 Jan 2011. http://bemidjistate.edu/students/wrc/tutoring_session/.

Hacker, Diana and Barbara Fister.  “Research and Documentation.”  hackerhandbooks.com, 2011.  Web 20 Jan 2011.  http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/resdoc5e/

“Incorporating References.”  KU Writing Center.  University of Kansas, 2011.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://www.writing.ku.edu/incorporating-references.

“Internet References.”  Purdue Online Writing Lab.  Purdue University, 2011.  Web. 20 Jan 2011. http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/738/01/

“Just Check My Grammar.” The Writing Center.  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2007.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/transitions-esl/.

“Outlines.”  KU Writing Center.  University of Kansas, 2011.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://www.writing.ku.edu/outlines.

“Paraphrase, Summary, and Precis.”  KU Writing Center.  University of Kansas, 2011.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://www.writing.ku.edu/paraphrase-and-summary.

“Plagiarism.” Writing Center.  Troy University, 2010.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://trojan.troy.edu/research/.

“Plagiarism-Making Sure You Are Safe.” Writing Center.  Troy University, 2010.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://trojan.troy.edu/research/.

“Prewriting Strategies.”  KU Writing Center.  University of Kansas, 2011.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://www.writing.ku.edu/prewriting-strategies.

“Proofread & Revise.” Writing Center.  Troy University, 2010.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://trojan.troy.edu/writingcenter/process.html.

“Research-based Writing.”  The University Center for Research-based Learning.  DePaul University, 2011.  Web. 20 Jan 2011.  http://condor.depaul.edu/writing/writers/types.html.

“Resources for Tutors.” College of Wooster – Writing Center. College of  Wooster, 2008. Web. 18 Jan 2011. http://www.wooster.edu/academics/apex/writing/ for tutors.html.

“Revising the Draft.”  The Writing Center.  Harvard College Writing Program, 2011.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  www.fas.harvard.edu/~wricntr/documents/Revising.html.

“Step Eight:  Improving and Refining Organization.” The Writing Center.  Portland State University, 2007.  Web. 19 Jan 2011. writingcenter.pdx.edu/resources/guide/step08.php.

“Step Five:  Creating an Organizational Plan.” The Writing Center.  Portland State University, 2007.  Web. 19 Jan 2011. writingcenter.pdx.edu/resources/guide/step05.php.

Step Nine:  Checking Your Use of Research.”  The Writing Center.  Portland State University, 2007.  Web. 19 Jan 2011. writingcenter.pdx.edu/resources/guide/step09.php.

Step Seven:  Expanding and Improving Ideas.”  The Writing Center.  Portland State University, 2007.  Web. 19 Jan 2011. writingcenter.pdx.edu/resources/guide/step07.php.

“Step Ten:  Checking Final Details.” The Writing Center.  Portland State University, 2007.  Web. 19 Jan 2011. writingcenter.pdx.edu/resources/guide/step10.php.

“Subject Specific Resources.” Purdue Online Writing Lab.  Purdue University, 2011.  Web. 20 Jan 2011. owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/4/.

The University of Chicago.  The Chicago Manual of Style Online, 2010..  Web. 20 Jan 2011.  www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/home.html.

“Thesis Statements.” The Writing Center.  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2007.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/thesis.html.

“SUNY Adirondack CRW Guides and Handbooks.”  The Center for Reading and Writing.  SUNY Adirondack, 2011.  Web. 20 Jan 2011.  http://libguides.sunyacc.edu/content.php?pid=47858&sid=1008451

“Ten Tips for ESL Tutorials.”  The Writing Center.  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2007.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/transitions-esl/.

Toledo, Cheri.  “‘Does Your Dog Bite?’  Creating Good Questions for Online Discussions.”  International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education 18.2 (2006) n.pag. Web 20 Jan 2011. http://www.isetl.org/ijtlhe/.

“Toulmin Demonstration.”  Writing@CSU.  Colorado State University, 2011.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  writing.colostate.edu/guides/reading/toulmin/pop2f.cfm

“Word Choice.” The Writing Center.  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2007.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/word-choice/.

“Writing Concisely.”  The Writing Center.  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2007.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/writing-concisely/

“Writing Conclusions.” Writing Center.  Troy University, 2010.  Web. 19 Jan 2011. http://trojan.troy.edu/writingcenter/process.html.

“Writing for Specific Fields,” The Writing Center.  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2007.  Web. 19 Jan 2011. http://writingcenter.unc.edu/handouts/

“Writing Guide:  Development.”  Writing@CSU.  Colorado State University, 2011.  Web. 19 Jan 2011.  http://writing.colostate.edu/guides/processes/develop/

“Writing Resources Guided Tour.”  The Writing Center.  Portland State University, 2007.  Web. 19 Jan 2011. http://writingcenter.pdx.edu/resources/index.php.

“Writing Self Assessment” Writing Center.  University of Washington Bothell.  2010.  Web 19 Jan 2011.  http://www.uwb.edu/writingcenter/assessment.

Reading and Study Skills

Below you will find useful resources to use as you look for ways to support your students while they learn to critically engage with texts.

“Helping Students Read Difficult Texts”
In chapter 8 of John Bean’s Engaging Ideas: The Professor’s Guide to Integrating Writing, Critical Thinking, and Active Learning in the Classroom, Bean provides reasons for students’ difficulty with text, offers strategies to help students read actively, and makes suggestions for assignments that require students to interact with text.
http://www.case.edu/writing/pedsem/Bean_ReadingDifficultTexts.pdf
Helping Students Read Difficult Text  PDF

Critical Reading and Thinking
Check out these ideas, handouts and worksheets from SUNY Empire State College to help students read thoughtfully and critically. You will find strategies to help students before, during, and after reading. Topics include: taking notes, close reading, summary, interpretation and evaluation,  as well as ideas for reading literature.
http://www.esc.edu/academicreadingexercises

Teaching Critical Reading at the College Level
The University of Wyoming has some quick ideas for guided practice in critical reading at the college level.

Critical/Analytical Reading
Combined critical/analytical reading ideas and the questions you might ask your students about text. Outline includes critical dialogue, intratextual, authorial, historical, allusive, generic, philosophical and subjective context.

Critical Reading of an Essay’s Argument
This link from Carson-Newman College discusses the basics of critical reading, contrasts the act of reading to extract information with reading critically, and outlines a five-step process for critical reading. Wheeler’s process includes pre-reading, interpretive reading, critical reading, synoptic reading and post-reading.
https://web.cn.edu/kwheeler/reading_basic.html

Reading Circle Activities
Take a look at these hands-on ideas for active reading circles. You may be able to modify the activities for your class.
Reading Circle Activities PDF
Reading Circle Ideas

Engaged Listening and Reading to Write
Instructional handouts from Texas A&M University on how to help students “read to write” and listen actively. The bottom instructional link offers quick support for  “Teaching Critical Thinking”.
http://writingcenter.tamu.edu/teaching-writing/instruction/
http://writingcenter.tamu.edu/teaching-writing/instruction/teaching-critical-thinking/

Student Engagement Techniques: A Handbook for College Faculty
Elizabeth Barkley’s book “is a comprehensive resource that offers college teachers a dynamic model for engaging students and includes over one hundred tips, strategies, and techniques that have been proven to help teachers from a wide variety of disciplines and institutions motivate and connect with their students.” This text was used for an RC faculty development “Teaching Circle” by Lysandra Perez-Strumbolo.  Copies are available in the Faculty Resource Center.
http://books.google.com/books?id=muAStyrwyZgC&lpg=PA1&ots=3tKEIIHvwM&dq=Barkley%20Student%20engagement%20techniques&lr&pg=PA26#v=onepage&q&f=false

Reader-Response Criticism
The Owl at Purdue presents reader response criticism theory and its role in determining the meaning of text.
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/722/06/

Enhanced Learning
Learning to Learn, Marcia Heimen, Ph.D.  “Learning to Learn ®(LTL) is a system of learning and reasoning strategies with a long history of research and development. The LTL system is based on research conducted at the University of Michigan on the thinking skills of successful learners.
http://www.learningtolearn.com/college/collegewhat.html

Choices of Successful Students (Responsibility, Motivation, Self-Management, Emotional Intelligence and more…)
Oncourse, Skip Downing:
“Synthesizing the best wisdom from innovators in psychology, education, business, sports, and personal effectiveness, the On Course Success Principles represent eight of the essential “things” that good learners believe and do. Founded on these timeless principles, the On Course text and the On Course Workshops give students and instructors alike a collection of practical success tools.”
http://oncourseworkshop.com/student-success-strategies/

Computer-Writing

The inexperienced and developmental writer manifest diverse learning abilities and needs.  Also, the student learns a wide range of skills in order to write, use information literacy, and read.  Computer-writing pedagogy is engaging and interactive and allows the instructor more effective classroom management for one-on-one instruction.

COMPUTER-WRITING PEDAGOGY FOR THE INEXPERIENCED AND DEVELOPMENTAL WRITER