Skip to main content
Latest Headlines

November 9, 2017

Ex-Defense Secretary Gates pushes for citizenship path for Dreamers who serve

https://www.politico.com/story/2017/11/09/robert-gates-daca-military-service-244736

September 5, 2017

Rescission Of Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

On September 5, 2017, the Trump administration rescinded DACA, providing a six-month period to “wind down” the program. A September 5, 2017 memo by DHS Acting Secretary Elaine C. Duke officially rescinds the June 15, 2012, memorandum that created the DACA program, and establishes the following DACA protocols:

  • Those currently enrolled in DACA will be able to continue working until their permits expire
  • DHS will no longer accept new DACA applications filed on or after September 6, 2017
  • DHS will continue to adjudicate on a case-by-case basis any new DACA applications properly filed and received by USCIS on and before September 5, 2017
  • Eligibility for DACA extensions
    • Those whose DACA permits expire by March 5, 2018, may apply for two-year DACA extensions if they apply for the extension by October 5, 2017
    • Those whose DACA permits expire on and after March 6, 2018 will not be eligible to file DACA extension applications
    • DHS will continue to adjudicate DACA extension applications that had been properly filed and received by USCIS on and before September 5, 2017, even if the current DACA approval of the applicant expires after March 5, 2018
  • DHS retains its discretionary authority to terminate or deny all types of deferred action, including DACA, when it determines that termination or denial is appropriate in particular cases
  • DACA Advance Parole:
    • Will “generally honor” previously approved DACA advance parole for the stated validity period, noting that CBP retains its authority to determining the admissibility of anyone presenting themselves at a U.S. port of entry, and that USCIS retains the right to revoke or terminate an advance parole document at any time
    • Will not approve any new Form I-131 applications for DACA advance parole received after September 5, 2017
    • Will administratively close all pending Form I-131 applications for DACA advance parole not approved before September 5, 2017, and refund the applicant’s filing fee

The six-month period established by this DACA phase-out should be used by Congress to consider legislation that will address the needs of DACAmented individuals.

Frequently Asked Questions

March 06, 2017

Statement by Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly on President’s Executive Order Signed Today 

March 03, 2017

USCIS Will Temporarily Suspend Premium Processing for all H-1B Petitions

Starting April 3, 2017, USCIS will temporarily suspend premium processing for all H-1B petitions. This suspension may last up to 6 months.

February 10, 2017

USCIS Will Accept Only New Forms After Feb. 21, 2017 Important reminder: Please check our website for our current filing fees and acceptable versions of forms. On Dec. 23, 2016, our new fees took effect and we published updated versions of our forms.

February 08, 2017

DHS Statement on Compliance with Recent Court Order On February 4, 2017, the Department of Homeland Security issued a statement reflecting the most recent court ruling on the Executive Order entitled, “Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States.”

February 03, 2017

USCIS Implementation of Jan. 27 Executive Order  USCIS continues to adjudicate applications and petitions filed for or on behalf of individuals in the United States regardless of their country of origin, and applications and petitions of lawful permanent residents outside the U.S.

President Mercer's Post

President Mercer routinely updates the President’s Post with information ranging from Campus-based achievements to national trends in higher education.

Most recently, the President’s Post was updated to include “Principles for Immigrant Students at Ramapo College.”

Visit the Post at www.ramapo.edu/pres-post

Consideration of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Process

September 5, 2017

Rescission Of Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

On September 5, 2017, the Trump administration rescinded DACA, providing a six-month period to “wind down” the program. A September 5, 2017 memo by DHS Acting Secretary Elaine C. Duke officially rescinds the June 15, 2012, memorandum that created the DACA program, and establishes the following DACA protocols:

  • Those currently enrolled in DACA will be able to continue working until their permits expire
  • DHS will no longer accept new DACA applications filed on or after September 6, 2017
  • DHS will continue to adjudicate on a case-by-case basis any new DACA applications properly filed and received by USCIS on and before September 5, 2017
  • Eligibility for DACA extensions
    • Those whose DACA permits expire by March 5, 2018, may apply for two-year DACA extensions if they apply for the extension by October 5, 2017
    • Those whose DACA permits expire on and after March 6, 2018 will not be eligible to file DACA extension applications
    • DHS will continue to adjudicate DACA extension applications that had been properly filed and received by USCIS on and before September 5, 2017, even if the current DACA approval of the applicant expires after March 5, 2018
  • DHS retains its discretionary authority to terminate or deny all types of deferred action, including DACA, when it determines that termination or denial is appropriate in particular cases
  • DACA Advance Parole:
    • Will “generally honor” previously approved DACA advance parole for the stated validity period, noting that CBP retains its authority to determining the admissibility of anyone presenting themselves at a U.S. port of entry, and that USCIS retains the right to revoke or terminate an advance parole document at any time
    • Will not approve any new Form I-131 applications for DACA advance parole received after September 5, 2017
    • Will administratively close all pending Form I-131 applications for DACA advance parole not approved before September 5, 2017, and refund the applicant’s filing fee.

    Individuals who have not submitted an application by Sept. 5, for an initial request under DACA may no longer apply. USCIS will reject all applications for initial requests received after Sept. 5.

    If … Then …
    You currently have DACA You will retain both your period of deferred action and your employment authorization document (EAD) until they expire, unless terminated or revoked.
     

    USCIS received your properly filed initial or renewal DACA request and associated application for an EAD on or before Sept. 5, 2017

     

     

    We will continue adjudicating your request.

    Your DACA expires between Sept. 5, 2017, and March 5, 2018, and you wish to renew it

     

    USCIS must receive your properly filed renewal request on or before Oct. 5, 2017.
    You did not request initial DACA on or before Sept. 5, 2017

     

    The DACA process is no longer available to you.
    Your DACA expired and you did not properly file your renewal request on or before Sept. 5, 2017

     

    The DACA process is no longer available to you.
    You have DACA and your still-valid EAD is lost, stolen, or destroyed

     

    You may submit Form I-765 to request a replacement EAD.

DACA Students and Study Abroad

Prior to the September 5, 2017 rescission of DACA, DHS had been approving applications for travel authorization called advance parole, which DACAmented students could use to travel abroad for “education, humanitarian and work purposes,” including participating in study abroad programs. The September 5, 2017 DACA rescission memo impacts DACA advance parole in the following ways:

  • DHS stated it will “generally honor” previously approved DACA advance parole for the stated validity period, but noted that CBP retains its authority to determine the admissibility of anyone presenting themselves at a U.S. port of entry, and that USCIS retains the right to revoke or terminate an advance parole document at any time
  • USCIS will not approve any new Form I-131 applications for DACA advance parole received after September 5, 2017
  • Will administratively close all pending Form I-131 applications for DACA advance parole not approved before September 5, 2017, and refund the applicant’s filing fee

Even before September 5, 2017, reentry to the United States could never be guaranteed, even with advance parole authorization and the approval of a university or education abroad office. NAFSA strongly encourages DACAmented students to seek the advice of an immigration attorney to weigh this risk before departing the United States to participate in a study abroad program. DACA students with an approved grant of advance parole who are currently studying abroad should also consult with their immigration lawyer about returning to the United States.

Frequently Asked Questions

(Please consult with your attorney or stop by our office for more information before you apply, file for an extension or plan to travel on Advance Parole).

Individuals can call USCIS at 1-800-375-5283 with questions or to request more information on the deferred action for childhood arrivals process or visit www.uscis.gov.

 

Basic DACA Eligibility Criteria (for reference purposes)

The information presented below has been collected to provide clear information regarding the DACA program. The information is not intended to constitute legal advice and should not be relied upon as such.

Under the program, starting August 15, 2012 qualified individuals became eligible to request DACA consideration if they:

  • Were under the age of 31 as of June 15, 2012;
  • Came to the United States before reaching their 16th birthday;
  • Have continuously resided in the United States since June 15, 2007, up to the present time;
  • Were physically present in the United States on June 15, 2012, and at the time of making their request for consideration of deferred action with USCIS;
  • Entered without inspection before June 15, 2012, or their lawful immigration status expired as of June 15, 2012;
  • Are currently in school, have graduated or obtained a certificate of completion from high school, have obtained a general education development (GED) certificate, or are an honorably discharged veteran of the Coast Guard or Armed Forces of the United States; and
  • Have not been convicted of a felony, significant misdemeanor, three or more other misdemeanors, and do not otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.
  • Are at least 15 years of age at the time of applying for DACA benefits (some exceptions apply)

DACA benefits are granted in increments of two years. Remember, though, that deferred action is a discretionary benefit for individuals who would otherwise be removable from the United States. USCIS will decide applications on a case-by-case basis. Although student advisers may wish to be generally aware of how the program works, individuals who wish to assess their eligibility for DACA-related benefits should be counseled to consult an experienced immigration lawyer or recognized/accredited organization or representative for legal advice or for legal assistance. Individuals should also be aware of immigration scams. USCIS urges individuals to visit www.uscis.gov/avoidscams for tips on filing forms, reporting scams and finding accredited legal services. Advisers may also want to direct people to the American Immigration Lawyers Association’s (AILA) AILA Consumer Advisory: Deferred Action for Certain Young Immigrants: Don’t Get Scammed!

 

DACA Resources for Students

Ramapo’s We Care Program provides resources for students who are DACA, experience food insecurity, suffer from homelessness, and those who are involved in foster care. https://www.ramapo.edu/oed/we-care-program/

Student Government Association Immigration-Related Resolution

The Student Government Association thanked everyone for expressing their views regarding Ramapo and a sanctuary campus during our Wednesday, February 22 General Meeting. The Senate passed a Resolution, attached below, which was created in response to the discussion at the meeting.

link

Should you have any questions or comments regarding the SGA or this resolution, please contact them using this link: https://www.ramapo.edu/sga/feedback/ 

DACA Resources for Faculty

https://www.ramapo.edu/frc/daca-resources/

President Trump's Executive Order

On January 27, 2017, President Trump signed Executive Order 13769, entitled Protecting the Nation from Terrorist Entry into the United States by Foreign Nationals. Under Section 3(c) of that Executive Order, entry into the United States of “immigrants and nonimmigrants” from at least 7 countries has been suspended for 90 days from the date the Executive Order was signed, “except for those traveling on diplomatic visas, North Atlantic Treaty Organization visas, C-2 visas for travel to the United Nations, and G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4 visas.” For now, these countries are:

  1. Iran
  2. Iraq
  3. Libya
  4. Somalia
  5. Sudan
  6. Syria
  7. Yemen

Section 3(c) of Executive Order 13769 reads:

“(c) To temporarily reduce investigative burdens on relevant agencies during the review period described in subsection (a) of this section, to ensure the proper review and maximum utilization of available resources for the screening of foreign nationals, and to ensure that adequate standards are established to prevent the terrorist or criminal infiltration of foreign nationals, pursuant to section 212(f) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1182(f), I hereby proclaim that the immigrant and nonimmigrant entry into the United States of aliens from countries referred to in section 217(a)(12) of the INA, 8 U.S.C. 1187(a)(12), would be detrimental to the interests of the United States, and I hereby suspend entry into the United States, as immigrants and nonimmigrants, of such persons for 90 days from the date of this order (excluding those foreign nationals traveling on diplomatic visas, North Atlantic Treaty Organization visas, C-2 visas for travel to the United Nations, and G-1, G-2, G-3, and G-4 visas).”

Automation Of Form I-94

U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (“CBP”) has announced its intention to electronically automate the Form I-94, starting immediately. In so doing, CBP will eliminate the paper I-94 and instead create an electronic file containing the information typically found on the paper form. You will still receive an admission stamp in your passports, indicating your status, date of admission, and term of admission. Additionally, upon entry, you should receive a web address from CBP where you can print your own copy of the automated Form I-94.

CBP intends to implement this system one port at a time, in two week cycles, beginning this month. No public schedule for automation of specific ports has been released.

Until DHS issues further guidance, if you are traveling this holiday season and enter through ports issuing automated I-94′s, we would urge you to contact our office immediately so that we may help you with the process.

Open Doors 2016 Report

Fast Facts: 2016 Open Doors Data (PDF)

Full Report: Open Doors

Useful Websites

U.S EMBASSIES, CONSULATES, AND DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS

http://www.usembassy.gov/