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The Internet can be a powerful tool for a successful job search. It is best utilized for researching careers, salaries and companies as well as networking and expanding contacts. The Internet can also be used to search for job listings, apply for open positions, and to post your resume for recruiters to view. Students should exercise caution when responding to job postings.

Ramapo College does not allow employers to post job opportunity flyers around campus. The only approved flyers are on the bulletin boards directly outside the Cahill Career Centers (C209 and ASB513) and in the Fishbowl. All approved flyers will have a stamp from either CSI or the Cahill Career Center. Do not respond to any flyers without an approval stamp. The Cahill Career Center researches all postings on Handshake to eliminate fraudulent employers.

FRAUD WARNING SIGNS:

  • You must provide your credit card, bank account numbers, or other personal financial documentation. Do NOT give out any financial information at any point during your job search and hiring process.
  • The posting appears to be from a reputable, familiar company (often a Fortune 500). Yet, the contact’s email address does not match the domain used by representatives of the company (this is typically easy to determine from the company’s website). Another way to validate is to check the open positions on the company’s website, by checking their careers/jobs page.
  • The contact email address contains the domain @live.com or an @ that is not affiliated with the company. Example: @gmail, @yahoo, @hotmail, etc.
  • The position requires an initial investment, such as a payment by wire service or courier.  Or if you are offered a large payment or reward in exchange for allowing the use of your bank account (often for depositing checks or transferring money).
  • You receive an unexpectedly large check (checks are typically slightly less than $500, generally sent or deposited on Fridays).
  • The interview is conducted online, via chat and an offer is given almost immediately.
  • The posting includes many spelling and grammatical errors.
  • You are asked to provide a photo of yourself, your social security and/or driver’s license information in the initial application. Personal information should never be asked during the initial application process.
  • The position is for any of the following: Bookkeeper, Executive Assistant, Envelope Stuffers, Home-based Assembly Jobs, Office Administrator, Online Surveys or Receptionist.
  • The posting neglects to mention the responsibilities of the job. Instead, the description focuses on the amount of money to be made.
  • The employer responds to you immediately after you submit your resume. Typically, resumes sent to an employer are reviewed by multiple individuals or not viewed until the posting has closed. Note: this does not include an auto-response you may receive from the employer once you have sent your resume.

ALWAYS DO YOUR RESEARCH!

  • Look at the company’s website. Does it have an index that tells you what the site is about; or does it contain information only about the job in which you are interested? Scammers often create quick, basic web pages that seem legitimate at first glance.
  • Watch for anonymity. If it is difficult to find an address, actual contact, company name, etc., this is cause to proceed with caution. Fraud postings are illegal, so scammers will try to keep themselves well hidden.
  • Google the company name and the word “scam” (e.g., Acme Company Scam) to see if the results show scam reports concerning this company.
  • Google the employer’s phone number, fax number, and/or email address. If it does not appear connected to an actual business organization, this is a red flag.

Students should contact the Cahill Career Center for assistance and questions regarding job postings.

Researching a Career / Company

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Job Searching